Deep Water | Extra Questions and Answers | Class 12

Published by Administrator on

MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS (MCQ – TEST)  

1.William Douglas was a friend and adviser of

(a) President Kennedy                                         (b) President Cleveland

(c) President Roosevelt                                       (d) President Clinton

2.in the essay William Douglas talks about his fear of

(a) fire                                                             (b) lizards

(c) snake                                                           (d) water

3.The writer decided to learn to swim when he was about

(a) ten or eleven years old                                  (b) fifteen or sixteen years old

(c) twenty years old                                              (d) eighteen years old

4. He decided to learn swimming in the pool at

(a) the local club                                            (b) his school

(c) Y.M.C.A                                                       (d) Country Club

5. His mother warned him against swimming in the Yakima River because it had

(a) strong currents                                                (b) it was meant only for boating

(c) many people had drowned there               (d) it had no lifeguards around

6. At the shallow end, the Y.M.C.A pool was

(a) I foot deep                                                                        (b) four feet deep

(c) two or three feet deep                                                   (d) five feet deep

7. The pool’s depth at the deep end was

(a) twenty feet                   (b) nine feet                              (c) six feet                          (d) eight feet

8. The author hated to walk naked to the pool as he had

(a) skinny arms                 (b) bony chest                           (c) skinny legs                    (d) hairy legs

9. The incident in childhood had taken place at the beach in

(a) Florida                          (b) Washington                          (c) New York                      (d) California

10. The introduction to the Y.M.C.A swimming pool revived for Douglas

(a) childhood fear of water                                                 (b) memories of a holiday at the beach

(c) memories of father and son companionship             (d) a terrible accident

11. The misadventure at the Y.M.C.A pool happened when

(a) Douglas was accompanied by friends                        (b) he was with his father

(c) he was alone                                                                    (d) he was with his mother

12. The boy who threw Douglas into the pool was about

(a) twenty years old                                                            (b) eighteen years old

(c) twenty-one years old                                                    (d) fifteen years old

13. Douglas calls him a

 (a) nasty human being                                                      (b) a brute

(c) a beautiful physical specimen                                   (d) a big bully

14. He tossed Douglas into the pool towards its

(a) shallow end                     (b) middle                           (c) edge                           (d) deep end

15. Though Douglas was frightened, he was not

(a) afraid to die                                                                  (b) going to survive

(c) out of his wits                                                               (d) able to shout for help

16. When his feet would hit the bottom Douglas planned to

(a) make a big jump                                                          (b) lie down

(c) start his strokes                                                            (d) float

17. The nine feet seemed to Douglas like

(a) hundred feet               (b) ninety feet                    (c) fifty feet                  (d) twenty-five feet

18. Douglas imagined that on hitting the bottom, he would

(a) bob to the surface like a cork

(b) would come up to Tab his water wings

(c) would lie flat and float up

(d) shout for help

19. When Douglas tried to yell

 (a) everyone came to his rescue

(b) no sound came out

(c) his father arrived

(d) the lifeguard dived to save him up, they hung as

20. As Douglas tried to bring his legs

(a) dead branches (b) dead weights

(c) dead sticks (d) dead bodies

21. The water in the pool had a

(a) dirty yellow tinge (b) a blue reflection

(c) green colour  (d) no colour

22. Douglas was seized by

 (a) the lifeguard (b) stark terror

(c) his friend (d) the boy who had thrown him

23. Douglas went down towards the bottom

 (a) only once (b) twice

(c) thrice (d) five times

24. After the third unsuccessful attempt to spring up, Douglas thought that he was

(a) floating in space (b) floating in the River Yakima

(c) floating in the air (d) floating in a rubber-tube

25. When he regained consciousness, he

(a) laughed at his experience (b) had 104° F fever

(c) shook and cried and didn’t eat anything (d) told his mother about his misadventure

26. Every time Douglas attempted to go inside water, his legs would

 (a) be shaky (b) make him run

(c) help him keep afloat (d) be paralyzed

27. After being haunted by fear for many years Douglas decided to learn to swim. He took the help of

(a) his mother (b) his father

(c) a friend  (d) an instructor

28. A rope was attached to

 (a) Douglas’ legs (b) Douglas’ arms

(c) Douglas’ belt  (d) Douglas’ swimming trunks

29. He practised in the pool

 (a) ten times a week (b) five days a week

(c) twice a week (d) thrice a week

30. Douglas’ tension started slackening after

 (a) four months (b) three months

(c) five months  (d) one month

31. Douglas had to repeat exhaling and inhaling exercises

(a) hundred times (b) forty times

(c) fifty times (d) ten times

32. ‘Now you can swim’. These words were spoken by

(a) Douglas’ father (b) teacher in school

(c) uncle (d) instructor

33. Whenever terror struck again, Douglas would start

 (a) shouting (b) laughing

(c) crying (d) talking to terror

34. Douglas swam the lake to Stamp Act Island covering a distance of

(a) five miles (b) seven miles

(c) two miles (d) one mile

35. ‘What do you think you can do to me’? These words were spoken by Douglas to

(a) a shark (b) to his enemy

(c) to the boy who pushed him (d) to terror

36. After swimming across to the other shore of Warm Lake, Douglas shouted with joy and his voice was returned as an echo by

 (a) Gilbert peak (b) Everest peak

(c) Alps (d) Blue Mountain

37. ‘All we have to fear is fear itself. Who said these words?

 (a) Douglas (b) his instructor

(c) his father (d) President Roosevelt

38. With his hard work, Douglas had

(a) conquered his fear of water (b) conquered Mount Everest

(c) got a good job (d) got a promotion

39. At the end of the experience, Douglas felt

(a) happy (b) released

(c) sad (d) victorious

40. His fear of water

(a) ruined his trips (b) made him extremely guilty

(c) was not liked by friends (d) made him weak

ANSWERS

1.(c) President Roosevelt

2. (d) water

3.(a) ten or eleven years old

4. (c) Y.M.C.A

5.(c) many people had drowned there

6. (c) two or three feet deep

7.(b) nine feet

8. (c) skinny legs

9.(d) California

10. (a) childhood fear of water

11.(c) he was alone

12. (b) eighteen years old

13.(c) a beautiful physical specimen

14. (d) deep end

15. (c) out of his wits

16. (a) make a big jump

17.(b) ninety feet

18. (a) bob to the surface like a cork

19.(b) no sound came out

20. (b) dead weights

21.(a) dirty yellow tinge

22. (b) stark, terror

23.(c) thrice

24. (a) was floating in space

25.(c) shook and cried and didn’t eat anything

26. (d) be paralyzed

27.(d) an instructor

28. (c) Douglas’ belt

29.(b) five days a week

30. (b) three months

31.(a) hundred times

32. (d) instructor

33.(d) talking to terror 

34. (c) two miles

35.(d) to terror

36. (a) Gilbert peak

37.(d) President Roosevelt 

38. (a) conquered his fear of water

39.(h) released

40. (a) ruined his trips

 Short Answer Type Questions  (30 to 40 words)

SHORT ANSWER TYPE QUESTIONS           

Q1. Douglas had a fear of water even before his experience of drowning in the Y.M.C.A pool? Why?

Ans. At the age of three or four, Douglas had gone with his father to the beach. A powerful wave had struck him and knocked him down while he was with his father in the surf. This experience had terrorized him and this fear stayed even as he grew older.

 Q2. What is the ‘misadventure’ that William Douglas speaks about?

 Ans. The misadventure tool place when Douglas went swimming in the Y.M.C.A pool. A big bruiser of a boy, about eighteen years old, picked him up and tossed him into the deep end. He swallowed a lot of water and went at once to the bottom. He planned to hit the bottom and make a big jump and come to the surface. But his plan failed and he almost had a brush with death.

 Q3. What was the bruising experience that Douglas had at the Y.M.C.A?

 Ans. To overcome his fear of water Douglas started learning swimming at the Y.M.C.A pool. However, he was tossed into the deep end of the pool by a big boy of eighteen. Douglas almost drowned in the incident and his fear of water became more intense and hard to overcome.

 Q4. What were the series of emotions and fears that Douglas experienced when he was thrown into the pool? What plans did he make to come to the surface?

 Ans. Douglas was frightened when he was thrown into the water but he did not lose his wits. He made a plan to make a big jump, to come to the surface, lie flat on it and paddle to the edge of the pool. He summoned all his strength and made a great spring upwards but instead, he came up slowly. He opened his eyes and saw nothing. He tried again but was seized by terror. He was shrieking underwater and was paralyzed-stiff and rigid with fear. He only knew one thing – that he was alive.

Q5. How did this experience affect him?

Ans. This experience revived the fear of water. He felt weak and trembled as he walked home. He shook and cried when he lay on his bed and could not eat anything that night. He was haunted by the frightening experience. The slightest exertion upset him, making him wobbly in the knees and sick in the stomach.

Q6. What strategy did the author remember when he was drowning in the Y.M.C.A pool?

 Ans. Douglas thought that as he would hit the bottom of the tiled pool, he would spring up like a cork to the surface, then lie flat on the water, strike out with his arms and thrash with his legs and reach the edge of the pool. However, this plan failed.

Q7. ‘I crossed to oblivion and the curtain of life fell’. Why did the author make this remark?

Ans. The author had made three futile attempts to spring up to the surface but as his strength failed and energy got exhausted, he gave up and stopped all his efforts. He relaxed and passed into a state of unconsciousness and then there was no fear after that.

Q8. Why was Douglas determined to get over his fear of water?

Ans. Douglas after his misadventure and a near brush with death became so scared of water that he could not go fishing, canoeing, boating and swimming. He tried hard to overcome his fear but it held him firmly in its grip. Finally, one October he decided to get an instructor and learn to swim. He started going to the pool 5 days a week, an hour each day.

 Q9. What joys did his fear of water deprive him off?

Ans. The author’s fear of water-deprived him of the joy of having fun with his friends during their fishing trips and also the thrill of canoeing, boating or swimming. The moment he would go near water, his fear of water would start haunting him.

 Q10. How did the instructor make a swimmer out of Douglas?

 Ans. The instructor put a belt around Douglas and attached a rope to the belt which went through a pulley that ran on an overhead cable. He held on to the rope and went back and forth across the pool for three months, after which his terror of water slackened a bit. He could put his face underwater and exhale and inhale with the nose out of the water. Then he learnt to kick with his legs for many weeks till he could relax. After seven months he could swim the entire length of the pool.

 Q11. How did Douglas make sure that he conquered the old terror?

Ans. Douglas would still feel the old terror even after the instructor taught him to swim. To overcome this fear, he started talking to terror and challenged it. He would go for another length of the pool after talking to terror. Still, to ensure that he conquered it completely he went to Lake Wentworth, dived at Triggers Island and swam two miles to Stamp Act is land. He tried all strokes, put his face underwater, and mocked at his terror which fled as he swam on.

Q12. What did the author mean by ‘But I was not finished’ after his swimming lessons with the instructor were over?

 Ans. The author’s remark meant that he was not sure whether his old terror had left him. He still felt scared and frightened while swimming the length of the pool up and down.

Q13. What impression do you get of Douglas from the essay?

 Ans. Douglas was a brave and strong-willed person. Despite his horrifying experiences in water when he almost drowned, he didn’t give up. He resolved to overcome his fear by learning to swim. He hired an instructor and with complete focus and determination, he succeeded in learning to swim.

Q14. What did Douglas experience as he went down to the bottom of the pool for the first time?

Ans. The movement towards the bottom of the pool after being tossed in it by a big boy was gradual as he was in the deep side. He felt nine feet to be ninety. His lungs were ready to burst before he touched the bottom. He did not lose his presence of mind and tried to make a great jump upwards.

Q15. What two things did Douglas dislike to do? Which one did he have to do and why?

 Ans. Douglas was very thin and hated to show his skinny legs. He was also scared of going into the pool alone. So he sat by the poolside and waited for others to come.

Q16. ‘On the way down I planned’, remarks Douglas. What plan had he devised and how far did it succeed?

Ans. After being tossed into the deep side of the pool, Douglas planned to save himself from being drowned. He decided to spring back to the surface like a cork after touching the bottom. Then he would lie flat on it, paddle to the edge and save himself. His plan did not succeed. He tried to come up three times by putting his plan to action, but he could not do so and swallowed a lot of water instead.

Q17. In what connection does Douglas mention ‘a big bruiser of a boy’?

Ans. Douglas talks about the boy who tossed him into the deep end of the Y.M.C.A pool. This boy was about eighteen, he had a good physique and ‘was a big bruiser’ according to Douglas. This boy, after Douglas almost drowned, exclaimed that he was only fooling.

Q18. How did Douglas initially feel when he went to the Y.M.C.A pool? What made him feel comfortable?

 Ans. As Douglas started going to the Y.M.C.A pool to learn how to swim. His childhood fears and memories of the unpleasant experience were revived. He gradually regained some confidence and started paddling with the help of water wings. He watched other boys and copied their style. Slowly he started feeling more comfortable.

 Q19. Give two character traits of Douglas that enabled him to overcome his fear of water.

Ans. Douglas had a strong-will and steadfastness of purpose. It is with the help of these two traits, i.e. his determination and fixity of purpose that he was able to conquer terror and learn swimming.

 Q20. What were the thoughts that came to Douglas’s mind when he was going towards the bottom of the pool for the third time?

Ans. When Douglas went down the third time, his effort ceased. He relaxed and his legs felt limp. He felt there was nothing to be afraid of. It was nice and he felt drowsy, ready to sleep, too tired to jump. He felt he was floating and the tender arms of his mother were carrying him gently and putting him to sleep.

 Q21. When did Douglas decide to learn swimming? What were the options available to him?

 Ans. Douglas decided to learn swimming when he was ten or eleven years old. The options available to him were the Yakima River and the YMCA pool. The Yakima River was dangerous and many had drowned in it. So he closes the YMCA pool.

 Q22. Why does Douglas recount a childhood experience of terror and his overcoming it?

 Ans. Douglas suffered a handicap. He could not go for boating, swimming, canoeing and fishing. His willpower and determination made him overcome it. He realised that there is the terror that fear produces. In death there is peace. He had experienced both the sensation of dying and the terror that fear of it can produce. So the will to live somehow grew in intensity. He felt a release when he overcame his fear.

Q21. What two things did Douglas dislike to do?

 Ans. Douglas hated to walk naked into the pool and show his very thin legs. Secondly, he was afraid of going into the pool alone. He would sit on the side of the pool and wait for others.

Q22. What shocking experience did Douglas have at YMCA pool?                                      

 Ans. At the age of ten or eleven, William O. Douglas decided to learn and swim at the YMCA pool because it was only two or three feet deep at the shallow end. He had an aversion to the water but he felt comfortable when he paddled with his new water wings in the water. One day he went to the pool when no one else was there. He was waiting for others to come. Then there came a big bruiser of a boy who picked Douglas and ducked him into the deep end. He landed in a sitting position, swallowed water and went at once to the bottom. Though he was saved, his fear of water intensified after this misadventure.

Q23. Why did Douglas fail to come to the surface of the pool as he hoped to?          

Ans. When Douglas was thrown into the pool by a muscular boy, he landed in a sitting position, swallowed water and touched the bottom. He was frightened but he had not lost his wit. He thought of a strategy to come up to the surface by making a big jump when his feet touched the bottom. But his lungs were about to burst. He thought to spring back to the surface like a cock but he moved slowly. He grew panicky and saw water everywhere. He reached up as if to catch a rope with his hands but he could not clutch water and was paralysed.

Q24. How did Douglas’ introduction to YMCA pool revive his childhood fear of water?

Ans. At the age of ten or eleven, William O. Douglas decided to learn and swim at the Y.M.C.A pool because it was only two or three feet deep at the shallow end. He had an aversion to the water but he felt comfortable when he paddled with his new water wings in the water. One day he went to the pool when no one else was there. He was waiting for others to come. Then there came a big bruiser who picked Douglas and ducked him into the deep land. He landed in a sitting position, swallowed water and went at once to the bottom. This misadventure revived his childhood fear of water.

25. When Douglas realised that he was sinking, how did he plan to save himself?

Ans. When Douglas was thrown into the deep water of the pool, he was terrified. He knew that going to drown as he didn’t know to swim. So he thought of a strategy to save himself. He decided that as his feet hit the bottom of the pool, he would make a big jump and come to the surface. Then he would swim to the edge of the pool.

26. How did Douglas’ misadventure at the YMCA pool affect his later life?

Ans. Douglas’ misadventure at the YMCA pool developed an aversion of water in him. He suffered from, hydrophobia and could not swim. As a result, he was devoid of pleasures of swimming, rafting, fishing, canoeing and other water sports. This made him feel incomplete.

27. What factors led Douglas to decide in favour of Y.M.C.A. pool?  

Ans. When Douglas was three years old, he was swept over by sea waves at the California beach. Since then he developed an aversion to water. But he wanted to learn to swim. So he decided to learn to swim in a safer place. The Y.M.C.A. pool was the safest pool with two or three feet deep at the shallow end and nine feet at the deep side. It was very safe even for the beginners. Thus Douglas decided to learn to swim at the Y.M.C.A. pool.

28. Why did Douglas go to Lake Wentworth in New Hampshire? How did he make his terror flee?

Or

 How did Douglas make sure that he conquered the old terror?

Ans. After getting training from the instructor, Douglas, in pursuit of complete elimination of the fear of water, decided to go to various water bodies. Finally, he decided to go to go to Lake Wentworth to test himself for fear. He swam there without fear, which made his confidant believe that he had chased away all residual fears and terrors.

29. How did William Douglas’ aversion to water begin?                                                       

Or

Which two incidents in Douglas’ early life made him scared of water?                             

 Ans. Douglas had a very bad experience at the age of three or four years. His father took him to the beach in California and there he was knocked down by huge waves and was almost buried under water. This left a scary impact on his mind. Second, when he was ten or eleven years old, a bruiser threw him into the Y.M.C.A. pool. This time he narrowly escaped death. He was saved from getting drowned but an aversion to water overpowered him. As a result, he became scared of water and couldn’t enjoy swimming, canoeing, fishing or any other water sport.

30. How did Douglas’s experience at the YMCA pool affect him?

Or

 How did the incident at the YMCA pool affect Douglas later in life?                                                

Ans. This incident spoiled the confidence of Douglas. He became hydrophobic and always avoided water. The moment he entered the water, his limbs would become paralysed and a terror would grab him. This fear ruined his fishing trips. He could not enjoy any water sports like canoeing, fishing, swimming, etc. due to this fear of water.

31. How did Douglas remove his residual doubts about his fear of water?

Or

“The instructor was finished. But I was not finished.” What does this refer to? Explain briefly.

Ans. The instructor worked with Douglas for seven months through rigorous training, the instructor made him get rid of his fear of water. But still some vestiges of fear used to haunt Douglas whenever he was alone in the water. So he decided to go the various water bodies to overcome his fear of water and become confident.

32. What was Douglas’ initial reaction on being thrown into the pool?

Ans. When Douglas was thrown into the pool, he was frightened. He knew that he was going to drown as he didn’t know to swim. But even then he was not out of his wits. On his way down the pool, he planned that when he hit the bottom, he would make a big jump, come to the surface, lie flat on it and paddle to the edge of the pool.

33. What sort of terror seized Douglas as he went down the water for a second time? How could he feel that he was still alive?

Ans. When Douglas went down for a second time, panic seized him. His lungs ached, his head throbbed and he was terrified. He was shrieking and was paralysed under water. But he could realise that he was alive as he shook and trembled with fright. He didn’t give up and tried for a third time to save himself.

34. What was the immediate effect of Douglas’ experience of nearly drowning in the pool? And what was the long-term effect?

Ans. The immediate effect was both physical and mental. He was sick and could not eat that night and was weak at the knees. It took him many days to recover. The long-term effect was that he developed hydrophobia, i.e. fear of water, and, as a result, he dreaded going near water to enjoy any water sport and fishing.

35. What happened to Douglas when he failed in his attempt to come onto the surface of the water a third time?

Ans. When Douglas was thrown into the pool, he tried his level best to save himself. He planned a strategy to come onto the surface of the water. He tried twice but failed. As Douglas went down for the third time, he sucked water as he tried to breathe air. Then all his efforts stopped. He had a blackout. Everything became quiet and calm.

36. Why did Douglas want to overcome his fear of water?

 Ans. Douglas wanted to overcome his fear of water because this fear had become his handicap. The moment he entered the water, his limbs would become paralysed and terror would grab him. This fear ruined all his fishing trips. He could not do canoeing, boating and swimming. So in order to enjoy his life completely, he decided to overcome his fear of water.

37. Why couldn’t Douglas come up in his first attempt?

 Ans. Douglas couldn’t come up in his first attempt, though he tried his best. His strategy didn’t work. His strategy was that when his feet hit the bottom, he would make a big jump, come onto the surface, lie flat on it and paddle to the edge. But by the time he reached the bottom, he felt as if his lungs were about to burst and he became helpless.

38. How did Douglas get rid of all the residual fear of water that he had?

Ans. The instructor had built as swimmer out of Douglas. But still same vestiges of fear used to haunt S whenever he was alone in the water. In order to get rid of all the residual fear, Douglas swam across various water bodies. He went up to the Tieton to Conrad Meadows, up the Conrad Creek ‘Bail to Meade Glacier and, finally, camped at Warm Lake.

39. Explain how Douglas felt when he was thrown into the pool. What plan did he make to come to the surface?

Ans. When Douglas was thrown into the pool, he got frightened and a sense of panic gripped him. But still was not out of his wits. He thought of a strategy to save himself. He decided that as his feet hit the bottom of the pool, he would make a big jump and come to the surface. He would lie flat on it and paddle to the edge of the pool.

 Important Long/ Detailed Answer Type Questions- to be answered in about 100 -150 words each Value-based questions-

Q1. How did the swimming instructor ‘build a swimmer’ out of Douglas?

 Ans. William Douglas had a most frightening and nightmarish experience at the Y.M.C.A pool when a boy of eighteen had tossed him into the pool and he had had a near brush with death. The terror that he experienced and the resulting fear of water prevented him from enjoying fishing, canoeing, swimming etc. with his friends. The fear became so deep-rooted that Douglas then decided to overcome it.

The first step he took was to get an instructor. The instructor made him swim five days a week and very patiently taught him how to exhale underwater and inhale above water. He made him practise very hard five days a week, an hour each day. His safety was ensured when the instructor put a belt around him, with a hook and a rope attached to it. An overhead cable had a pulley in it and the rope going over it. The instructor would hold the rope while Douglas swam from one end of the pool to the other. In about six months, and with a lot of hard work and determination, Douglas was able to perfect the art of swimming. His instructor had built a swimmer out of him, bit by bit.

Q2. A big boy threw Douglas into the swimming pool. How did this experience affect Douglas?

Ans. William Douglas had decided to overcome his childhood fear of water and joined the Y.M.C.A swimming pool. He had gradually gathered confidence and was trying to learn swimming by using water wings and aping other boys. Just when he was beginning to feel at ease, the misadventure happened.

A big boy, about eighteen years of age, saw Douglas sitting by the poolside and tossed him into the deep side of the pool. Douglas was frightened but did not lose his wits. He planned the strategy of giving himself a thrust just as he would touch the bottom and then move up to the surface of the water and float towards the edge. His plans failed and thrice he went up and down in the water, being unable to reach the surface and breathe. He had almost given up when he was rescued. The boy admitted that he was only ‘fooling’.

Douglas had to pay a heavy price for this ‘joke’. He was shocked and trembled when he recovered from this incident. But worse was the fact that his fear turned into terror and a sort of phobia. He could not get into the Cascades or bathe in the Warm Lake. He could not even go for fishing, canoeing, boating or swimming. His fear of water deprived him of all the joys that he wanted to experience in the water. He tried hard to overcome his fear but psychologically, the fear had a strong hold on him.

3. How did Douglas try to save himself from drowning in the YMCA pool?

Ans. When Douglas was flung into the swimming pool by a big boy, he became fearful. But he thought rationally and planned a strategy to save himself self f from drowning. He decided that as he hit the bottom of the pool, he would take a big jump to come to the surface of the water. Then he would lie flat and paddle to the edge of the pool. But unfortunately, it took so long for him to reach the bottom and felt as if his lungs would burst. Even then he tried to take a big jump using all his might but in vain. Once again, he tried the same technique but his action did not produce the desired result. Finally, panic seized him. His limbs got numb and he fainted.

4. How did Douglas develop an aversion to water?

Or

‘I crossed to oblivion, and the curtain of life fell.’ What was the incident which nearly killed Douglas and developed in him a strong aversion to water?                                                           

Ans. When Douglas was three or four years old, his father took him to the beach in California. The waves of the sea knocked him down and almost buried him in water. He was terrified and unable to breathe. Since then he developed an aversion to water. Later on, when he was ten or eleven years old, one day while sitting on the side of the swimming pool, he was flung into the pool by a bruiser.

It was really an encounter with death. He underwent a terrible experience in his attempt to save himself. He almost drowned in water, which suffocated him, an abject fear immobilised his limbs. Though he was rescued, he became hydrophobic. He could not swim and do any other water activities like canoeing, fishing, boating, rafting, etc. Every time he came in contact with water, pangs of panic would paralyse him. He spent many years of his life under this fear and then finally decided to conquer it.

5. Douglas fully realised the truth of Roosevelt’s statement, “All we have to fear is fear itself.” How did this realization help him brush aside his fear and become an expert swimmer?

 Ans. Fear is a paralysing emotion. It restricts all kinds of efforts, creativity and all kinds of ventures that one thinks of achieving. But with the help of grit, determination and hard work, fear can be conquered. William Douglas proved this. He chased away his fear of water by first psychoanalysing it and then treating it in a systematic manner. After his misadventure at YMCA pool, Douglas has developed hydrophobia. In spite of that, he hired a professional trainer and learnt swimming step by step. Due to his strong willpower and rigorous practice, Douglas was made a swimmer by the trainer. But even now Douglas was not satisfied and set a higher benchmark for his perfection and devised various tests and situations to defeat the fear in all forms. Thus, ultimately, Douglas was able to overpower his fear of water completely and became an expert swimmer.

6. Desire, determination and diligence lead to success. Explain the value of these qualities in the light of Douglas’ experience in Deep Water.

Or

 Courage and optimism are attributes that can make the impossible possible. Elucidate with reference to Deep Water.

Ans. It is only through courage, desire and determination that man has succeeded in making the impossible possible. The most appropriate example is William Douglas’ pursuit to overcome his fear of water. After the terrible experience of almost drowning at the Y.M.C.A. swimming pool, Douglas developed a fear of water. The moment he entered the water, pangs of panic paralysed his lumps. He spent many years of his life, under this fear. But finally, he decided to overcome this fear and succeeded in his attempts due to his relentless efforts and positive approach. He hired the services of an instructor, who after rigorous training and special technique, built a swimmer out of him. It took Douglas almost seven months to overcome this fear. But, finally, Douglas proved that it was courage, determination, desire, diligence and optimism that made him get rid of fear.

7. ‘This handicap stayed with me as the years rolled by.’ Which handicap is being referred to and what are the events that made Douglas handicapped?

Ans. The handicap being referred to is the fear of water Douglas had developed due to some unfortunate incidents in his childhood. As a result, he could not enjoy water sports and swimming. When he was three or four years old, his father took him to the beach in California. Douglas was knocked down by the sea waves and was almost buried in water. He developed an aversion to water. Moreover, when he was ten or eleven years old, a bruiser flung him into a swimming pool. At that time he had a terrible experience. He was almost in the water, which suffocated him and the fear immobilised his limbs. However, he somehow escaped drowning. Since then he was scared of water and could not enjoy canoeing, swimming, rafting, fishing, etc. This became a handicap for him, as he was deprived of the joy of water sports and swimming.

8. But I was not finished.’ Describe how Douglas gained confidence as a swimmer after the instructor had left him.

 Ans. Douglas was slowly made a swimmer by the instructor. He trained him to overcome his fear of water, swim, move his legs and inhale and exhale while swimming. In seven months, the instructor made a swimmer out of Douglas. But Douglas was not confident as yet. The vestiges of fear of water still haunted him. So he decided to swim in various pools and lakes to completely overcome his fear. He went to the Tieton to Conrad Meadows, up the Conrad Creek Trail, to Meade Glacier and finally swam in Warm Lake. After this, Douglas was confident that he had completely overcome his fear of water.

9. Do you think that ‘Deep Water’ is an appropriate title? Give reasons in support of your answer.

Ans. ‘Deep Water’ is the most appropriate title for the chapter. Literally ‘deep water’ means ‘in trouble’. The author suffered from hydrophobia and was really afraid of going deep in water. The misadventure at the YMCA pool made his efforts more difficult when a big bruiser threw him into deep water. The author underwent a series of emotions under water. He made a plan to come up to the surface of the water but failed. He was somehow rescued and saved. In order to overcome his fear, he hired an instructor and mastered each step of swimming. His grit, determination and rigorous practice enabled him to be an expert swimmer. The title signifies that the phobia of water was very deep rooted and had to be pulled out with great difficulty.

VALUE BASED QUESTIONS

Answer the following questions                                                                                         

Q1. Roosevelt said, “All we have to fear is fear’. Do you agree? Take evidence from ‘Deep Water’ and express your views in 120-150 words.

Ans. Roosevelt rightly said that it is fear that is the greatest impediment in the path of success. It hampers progress as it limits us. It is only when we overcome the fear that we can achieve success.

Douglas had an aversion for water. It deprived him of activities like swimming, boating, fishing and canoeing. He decided to take steps to overcome this fear. He resolved to learn swimming by engaging an instructor. The instructor built Douglas into a swimmer. In six months he conquered his fear. However, even though he could now swim, he still felt terrified of water. With willpower and determination, he gradually overcame fear.

 Q2. Douglas was tossed into the pool by a bruiser of a boy Bullying is prevalent in schools and colleges. Write an article on ‘Bullying, a threat to the development of a child.’

 Ans. Douglas had developed a fear of water since childhood. At the Y.M.C.A Swimming Pool, a big bruiser of a boy suddenly played a dangerous prank and pushed him into the water. The narrator was frightened.

Bullying can cause long-term problems to the victims of bullying. Educators and students themselves have to take measures to curb this problem. Children must take the initiative and report the cases immediately to parents and teachers. Douglas, with his determination and perseverance, could overcome his fear. Similarly, victims of bullying can also do so. It is important for children to have open communication with parents.

3. Cases of older children bullying younger ones have become alarmingly common, especially in the school How would you connect it to William Douglas’ experience at the YMCA swimming pool? What is the mindset of the modern youth that is reflected through such incidents? Which values do you think we must imbibe in order to change?

 Ans. Bullying at school or at college is common. Senior students making fun and at times physically assaulting and mentally torturing the juniors have become very common nowadays. This is what happened with Douglas at the YMCA pool when a big bruiser threw him into the deep water. The youth today When that by such acts they want to showcase their might. But they fail to understand that the one who exerts his might on the weaker is the weakest. We need to speculate the reason for bullying others and also the way to fight such bullies and to save ourselves. The first quality that the youth needs to nurture is confidence in themselves and to be free from any complexes. They need to be honest and accept their weakness or shortcomings bravely. They should never pretend to be over smart. On the other hand, they should not allow everyone to order them or unnecessarily overpower them. The present youth must imbibe the toughness, right approach, willpower and concerted efforts. Thus, if the present generation is vigilant, confident and cautious, evils like bullying will soon be overcome.

4. There is terror only in the fear of death’, as Roosevelt knew when he said, ‘All we have to fear is fear itself.’ Coming face to face with fear, instead of suppressing it, helps one to do away with it completely, just like Douglas did in the story ‘Deep Water’. What qualities should one possess to live a rich and fulfilling life by overcoming fear?

 Ans. Fear is just a state of mind and as Roosevelt has rightly said, ‘All we have to fear is fear itself.’ No doubt, if one wants to live a fulfilled life, one must get rid of all kinds of fears that restrict one’s happiness. But most of us live in the fear of one thing or the other throughout our life. One needs to be strong and determined, like Douglas, to overcome fear. When he was flung into the pool by a bruiser, Douglas did not give up. Though fearful, he showed his determination to save himself by attempting three times to come on the surface. In spite of being hydrophobic, Douglas decided to conquer his fear of water. It was only due to his willpower and perseverance that the instructor could build a swimmer out of him. His persistent efforts and rigorous practice were the key factors. Even after the instructor told him that he had become a swimmer, Douglas tested himself by swimming in different lakes and finally got satisfaction at Warm Lake. It was his steadiness and tenacity which empowered him to fight and shed away the fear from his mind.

Advertisements

1 Comment

Aditya Raj · April 26, 2021 at 9:34 am

This website helped me a lot during my annual examination.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.